Church teaching on scandal taken, discord and contention

Church teaching on scandal taken, discord and contention

+St. Bernardine of Siena+

Over the past several years, the majority of questions posed by readers have involved how one is to conduct oneself among the Novus Ordo and Traditionalist sects regarding prayer in common with non-Catholics, attendance at and participation in weddings and funerals, sponsorship at Baptism, etc. When site revisions are completed, articles addressing these issues will be posted. In the meantime, a particular question has arisen that should be addressed to avoid any further confusion and speculation. After searching my library for days, a more definitive answer on this question has finally been located. It involves praying privately inside a pre-1958 Catholic church in order to make reparation for the false sacrifices offered there.

When questions like this arise, we cannot rely on a knee-jerk reaction to resolve them. While we may have the best of intentions, an opinion, however well-educated we think it might be, is not sufficient when we are dealing with matters that could involve serious sin such as communicatio in sacris. In these times when we have no clergy to approach for resolution of these cases the only thing we can do is to consult approved works written by valid pre-1959 clergy citing documents from the Roman Congregations and the Holy Office to provide a trustworthy answer to our questions. The selection below is taken from Questions and Answers II, Precepts, by Canon E. J. Mahoney, D.D., 1948, compiled from articles printed in the Clergy Review in Great Britain from 1931 to 1947:

“Titius is in the habit of entering the ancient cathedrals of this country, and other pre-Reformation churches now in Protestant hands, when no Protestant service is being performed, and there praying for the return of this country, and of the formerly Catholic shrine, to the faith. He is motived by thef acts (a) that this is in itself a good thing; (b) that at least some Catholic worship and reparation are thus offered in the desecrated shrine; and (c) that Catholics are encouraged at times to do this, e.g. the annual Catholic visit to the shrine ofSt Edwardat Westminster. On theother hand, he is aware of the possibility of scandal at being seen praying in a Protestant place of worship; also he is afraid there may be some positive prohibition of the practice, when not specially authorized by authority, as in the above case of St. Edward’s Shrine. What is to be answered?

“The principle is stated in an instruction of the Holy Office, given for the faithful of Kentucky, 13 January, 1818: An liceat Catholicis adire templa hareticorum?;Licere, si adeant merae curiositatis causa, absque ulla com- municatione in sacris, in qua talis aditus communiter habeatur pro actu protestativo falsae religionis; quandoquidem sicuti profana aedificia, sic et templa haereticorum adire, est actus per se indifferens; qui non nisi a pravo fine, vel ex circumstantiis efficitur malus. Malus nimirium efficitur: 1. Si quis ea adeat animo adsistendi sacris haereticorum functionibus; 2 . vel etiam sine tali animo, si ingressus ipse in haereticorum ecclesias aliquam inferat vel inferre videatur cum iisdem haereticis in divinis communicationem, hinc et scandali occasionem praebeat . . . . 4. vel utrumque communiter habeatur veluti tessera unius eiusdemque communionis catholicorum et acatholi- corum.’

“The reply is concerned chiefly with permitting such visits curiositatis causa, and I know of no definite instruction which covers exactly the point raised above. But it is clear, both from this text and from other instructions, that what is absolutely forbidden is communicating in the worship of heretics even though the prayers said contain nothing heretical. Therefore, the use of a building is indifferent. The Church even tolerates, for proportionately grave reasons the use for public Catholic worship of a building which belongs to non-Catholics or is used alternately by Catholics and non-Catholics, as for example the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Granted its intrinsic lawfulness, the question can be answered by applying the voluntarium indirectum principle to each individual case. The point to be examined is whether the possible scandal, or danger of perversion, is compensated by a proportionately grave cause justifying the practice.

“In the case of public Catholic worship in non-Catholic churches the permission of the Ordinary must be obtained, as is done, presumably, in the case of St. Edward’s Shrine, or in the case of Mass celebrated in the ruins of a monastic church. But an individual may arrive at a prudent decision, if necessary, by consulting a confessor, in determining the lawfulness of private prayer. If one may consider the generality of cases of this kind, it appears that, whereas it is the exception to tolerate the presence of a Catholic at non-Catholic religious rites, it would be rather the exception to prohibit the practice of private prayer in a pre-Reformation church. For it would only be in exceptional cases that any scandal or danger of perversion would arise. A recent convert, for example, in a cathedral town, should not be allowed to visit the cathedral for private prayer; there is danger of perversion. Likewise no Catholic should use a pre-Reformation church which is now devoted by Anglicans to a close imitation of “Roman” rites; there is possibility of scandal. Similarly, one should not visit a pre-Reformation church situated in one’s own parish; there would be danger of giving scandal to the Catholic population. But, apart from such cases, no bad result can usually be anticipated. On the contrary, it is good for the sacred building to be used occasionally by the faithful for whom it was erected, and I believe it is a fairly common practice for the clergy to recite their office in such churches” (end of Mahoney quote).

Comments

It should be said from the outset that such cases must be judged based on the particular circumstances and according to the intentions of the person entering the church. That being said, it is hard to see how doing so with caution in these times and in the absence of true scandal could be taken as sinful or wrong in any way. To answer questions that may arise after reading the above, we would like to note the following.
  1. Canon Mahoney discourages this practice if the pre-Reformation church in question is used for services “in close imitation of Roman rites.” Here I believe he is referring to high Anglicans who conform more closely with some Catholic rituals and even include some Latin in their services at times. This would apply to Traditionalist services far more than to the Novus Ordo, (but the services are not Traditionalist in this case but Novus Ordo). In other words, it would be prohibited to pray in any Traditionalist church. a) I do not think anyone believes the Novus Ordo rite can any longer be considered a “close imitation” of Roman rites. Mahoney also says there is only the “possibility” of scandal but who would be scandalized given our current situation today? b) As Rev. John R. Bancroft, C.S.S.R., J.C.B., S.T.L. reminds us in his 1943 CUA Canon Law dissertation, Communication in Religious Worship with Non-Catholics: “When the danger of perversion or scandal to the faithful is not to be feared, what is not illicit in itself may be tolerated more easily and priests should be cautious about forbidding what can never be permitted lest they disturb good faith without hope of fruit.” The Church herself declares that praying in such churches is not illicit and Canon Mahoney even deems it commendable. If even priests should be cautious in prohibiting such things, all the more so the laity in these circumstances.
  2. As far as praying in a church situated in one’s own parish, we have no such parishes per se any longer, and there are no fellow Catholics to scandalize.
  3. Taking scandal at such things is not the same as actually being scandalized in the proper sense. Taking scandal consists in thinking we see sin or offensive behavior where there is none. Fr. Frederick Faber writes in his Spiritual Conferences: “To give scandal is a great fault, but to take scandal is a greater fault. It implies a greater amount of wrongness in ourselves, and it does a greater amount of mischief to others” (https://www.fisheaters.com/ontakingscandal.html).

Rules of fraternal correction

Before becoming alarmed at what we believe to be sinful or offensive behavior, we need to make certain it is truly what we believe it to be and that we are obligated to address it. The following is taken from Moral Theology: A Complete Course Based on St. Thomas Aquinas and the Best Modern Authorities by John A. McHugh and Charles J. Callan, 1958:

  1. IT IS NOT OFTEN NECESSARY FOR ONE WHO IS NOT A SUPERIOR TO MAKE FRATERNAL CORRECTION, SINCE THERE ARE MANY CONDITIONS THAT MUST EXIST BEFORE ONE IS OBLIGED TO IT. These conditions include the purpose to be attained, of which we have just spoken, and the proper circumstances, which are as follows: (a) THE FAULT TO BE CORRECTED SHOULD BE A KNOWN AND SERIOUS SIN; (b) the person to give the correction should be one who has the right and duty to correct; (c) the manner of giving the correction should be such as will promote the end in view.
  2. ONE SHOULD NOT ATTEMPT TO CORRECT A FAULT, UNLESS ONE IS MORALLY SURE THAT A FAULT HAS BEEN COMMITTED OR IS ABOUT TO BE COMMITTED. For this reason the scrupulous, who are inclined to suspect or see evil where there is none, are generally excused from the duty of making corrections.
  3. Since fraternal correction is given for the purpose of converting a sinner from the evil of his ways, IT IS NOT CALLED FOR WHEN ONE’S NEIGHBOR IS NOT A SINNER, strictly speaking, or has already reformed. Thus, there is no need of this correction in the following cases: (a) WHEN A PERSON SINS THROUGH IGNORANCE AND IS NOT GUILTY OF FORMAL SIN; (b) when a person who was a sinner in the past has given up his old ways.

If the person is a superior with the obligation to correct, and is certain they are not afflicted with scruples, how can morally certainty be obtained in such cases? Primarily by consulting works that treat of the case at issue and following them. We are not allowed to correct another in such instances unless we are certain, based on the teachings of the Church, the approved canonists and doctors of sacred theology and the moral theologians, that they are sinning. This not only injures our neighbor and may even alienate him, but involves ourselves in sins against prudence and even more other serious sins as well.

And from here we head into a different but related issue that also has been making the rounds these days. If we wish to live in peace with our neighbor, to experience the fruits of a prayer apostolate and continuing study of the faith, we must avoid all those things the New Testament teaches regarding charity and love of the brethren. Unless we all purge ourselves of any inclination whatsoever to sins against charity, we will become nothing more than those eventually exiting and recreating the forever splintering Traditionalist sects. St. Thomas Aquinas, quoted by Revs. McHugh and Callan, explains the dangers of these sins below

Sins Against Peace (Summa Theologica, II-II, qq. 37-42.)

  1. Sinfulness of Unintentional Discord — (a) From its nature, this kind of discord is not opposed to charity, nor is it sinful; for the concord of charity consists in a union of wills, not in a union of opinions. Thus, the disagreement between Paul and Barnabas about John Mark (Acts, xv. 39) was not sinful, although the difference of judgment indicated their human limitations. (b) From its circumstances, this kind of discord may be sinful, as when it is caused by culpable ignorance in matters of faith, or is carried on with obstinacy.
  1. By whom is the sin of discord committed? (a) It is committed sometimes by one party only, as when one knowingly resists the will of another who wishes to perform a necessary act of charity. (b) It is committed at other times by both parties, as when each in defending his own good infringes knowingly on the charity due the other.
  1. 1355. Contention — Contention is discord carried into words or equivalent signs, (i.e., a dispute or altercation), in which one denies what the other affirms. It is divided as follows: (a) by reason of the intention, it is either an investigation of the truth, a defense of the truth, or an attack on the truth; (b) by reason of the manner in which it is conducted, it is either suitable or unsuitable to the persons and the matter in question.
  1. Contention whose aim is the discovery of the truth is lawful as follows. (a) Such contention is lawful and useful in itself, for it is a means of acquiring useful knowledge, of seeing both sides of a question, and of sharpening the mind for the refutation of error. Hence, a contest in a court of justice, a controversy in a scientific journal, a public debate on some important matter, and a theological disputation are according to their nature lawful, and may be necessary. (b) DEBATE IS UNLAWFUL IN ITS MANNER WHEN A DISPUTANT DOES NOT ARGUE ACCORDING TO THE RULES, APPEALS TO PREJUDICE OR IGNORANCE, USES AN INSULTING TONE OR UNPARLIAMENTARY LANGUAGE, ETC.
  1. The Sin of Contention — Contention is a sin when its aim is the concealment or discomfiture of the truth. (a) From its nature this kind of contention is a mortal sin, for it is the external expression of internal discord in matters about which charity requires concord and the same speech. Hence, the Apostle numbers contention among the works of the flesh that exclude from the kingdom of God (Gal, v. 20). (b) From the lightness of the matter or the imperfection of the consent, this kind of contention is very often, if not usually, only a venial sin, or no sin at all. Examples: A person argues against what he knows is true, but the matter is trivial (e.g., his weight); or he is distracted by the heat of dispute or the tactics of the other party.
  1. Mortal sin is not committed by contention, therefore, unless the truths against which one contends are of a serious kind. Such truths are: (a) truths of a religious or moral character, such as the doctrines of faith and the commandments of God; (b) natural truths of a universal character, the knowledge of which pertains to the perfection of the intellect, such as first principles; (c) natural truths of a particular character in which important rights are involved. Example: An historian who writes against some deservedly revered person of the past, or a lawyer who attempts to prove against an accused what he knows is not a fact, are guilty of the sin of contention.
  2. Hence, one may be defending one kind of truth and contending against another kind of truth at the same time. St. Paul, accordingly, makes the distinction between announcement of the truth out of charity and announcement of the truth out of contention (Philip, i, 15 sqq.). (a) The truth is defended out of charity when one does not use truth as a means for the defense of error; (b) it is defended out of contention when one makes use of it as a means for the propagation of error. Thus, while St. Paul was imprisoned at Rome in 61, certain personal enemies preached Christ, but at the same time spoke or hinted falsehoods against St. Paul in order to undermine his authority or add to the bitterness of his captivity. [To defend] the truth to make oneself appear different or better than one is, one speaks from contention.
  3. Ways in which one is guilty of the mortal sin of contention: (a) when one contends formally against the truth, that is, when one knows the truth and intends to overcome it or suppress it; (b) when one contends virtually against the truth, that is, when one is so bent on carrying one’s point that one does not care whether it is true or false. Thus, the Sophists aimed to win, right or wrong.
  1. When the aim of contention is the overthrow of error: (a) in itself, such contention is good and praiseworthy, and at times necessary; (b) by reason of circumstances, it may be a venial or a mortal sin. Examples: A dispute on a matter that is unbecoming, such as which of the disputants is greater (Luke, xxii. 24); dispute with greater warmth than the case requires; a dispute that leads to scandal or other evil consequences, as in religious controversies (I Tim., ii. 14).

While spending time with the conclavists, such discord and contention was rife and was actually encouraged by the group’s head.  All of those involved, but especially the young, were truly scandalized by it and many of them lost their faith. To this day, those of us who were adults emerging from that sect deeply regret that we did not recognize it for what it was and immediately put an end to it. These sins against peace have been the cause among Traditionalists of family upheaval, economic hardship, lost children, divorce, ruined friendships, mental illness and much more. Therefore the axe needs to be put to the root of this evil tree before it bears any further bad fruits. If we did not speak out against it God would hold us accountable. For “It is better that scandals arise than the truth be suppressed.” -– Pope St. Gregory the Great

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Be ye perfect and live in the Spirit!

Be ye perfect and live in the Spirit!

+ St. Robert Bellarmine+

Having laid aside various distractions and phantoms, it is time to regroup and start paying attention to our day-to-day spiritual life. This was the purpose of creating the prayer society — and it needs to be supplemented with material that will help nourish and develop the interior life so long neglected for lack of spiritual directors and reading material appropriate to these times. Yes, I will still call out Trads when necessary, but only briefly and by pointing to previously published works.  The focus however will be self, myself and yourselves. My English ancestors’ motto, in the days before the Reformation, was “Nosce te ipsum” — know thyself. For without self-knowledge there can be no spiritual realization and therefore no advancement.

So where to begin? A Jesuit priest writing in 1953 provides a short and simple evaluation of what to address first; a link to this work and an excellent work on the Holy Ghost by Henry Edward Cardinal Manning will be provided below. The work by the Jesuit priest , Fr. Eiten, emphasizes the need to perfect ourselves, and this is the goal, but first it may be useful to drive home the reasons why we should strive for perfection and the initial step needed to begin that journey.  A fellow pray-at-home blogger has pointed out the importance of realizing the necessity of practicing the presence of God, and this is indeed essential to prayer life (https://catholiceclipsed.com/2022/04/13/on-the-omnipresence-of-god-and-the-self/). But the most compelling reason for this practice is something few of us really comprehend.

As Saint Paul writes, “Live in the spirit!” This is the title of Fr. Bruno Hagspiel S.V.D.’s touching and very instructive work, written in 1957. He lamented that rather than being revived in the 20th century, devotion to the Holy Ghost “has fallen into near oblivion” (p. 2). Hagspiel, a retreat master and an acclaimed author on the spiritual life, very carefully guides his readers around the many pitfalls that prevent them from realizing their commitment to live in the spirit and in so doing renew their spiritual life. While Fr. Hagspiel’s work was written for religious women, it provides a sound foundation that can be used by the laity as well to reawaken their Catholic instincts and arm themselves for the spiritual combat that today so closely resembles the circumstances of the early Christian martyrs.

Fr. Hagspiel tells us: “St. Paul, writing to the various churches and reprimanding the faithful for various vices and abuses that had crept into their congregations used a uniquely sharp tone in reminding them that they are temples of the Holy Ghost: “Know you not that you are the temple of God and the spirit of God dwelleth in you? (1 Corinthians 3:16 and Romans 6:19). In other words, how could you ever fall so deeply? How could you ever forget that you are the very temples of the Holy Ghost who is in you? With him in you, you no longer belong to yourselves. This is a truth that you should never forget, for without it how can you practice faithfully the essential Christian virtues?” And Fr, Hagspiel says that those are namely charity, chastity and a childlike trust in God, a trust which the great spiritual master, Fr. Frederick Faber, describes as “…The strength of love… chastised, equable and steadfast. It breaks out into action as if it could not be kept in…It has also the same irresistible tendency to prayer which it has to action… All our spiritual exercises, whatever nature they may be, are so many means of acquiring confidence in God.” Fr. Hagspiel continues:

“In this world of sudden events and sudden changes, in these days of growing unrest and gloom and depression, do we not need such trust and confidence in God more than ever before? what if we, in our own country, should have to face such days of bloodshed and persecution as our brethren have had to face in Russia, Mexico, Austria, Poland, Hungary etc.? How shall we be able to bear such trials bravely and valiantly if we are not strong in our trust and confidence in the indwelling spirit of the living God?”  And here he gives a little prayer Cardinal Mercier wrote called “A Secret to Sanctity.” The cardinal writes: “I am going to reveal to you a secret of sanctity and happiness. If every day, during five minutes, you will keep your imagination quiet shut your eyes to all the things of sense and close your ears to all the sound of earth so as to be able to withdraw unto the sanctuary of your baptized soul, which is the temple of the Holy Ghost, speak there to the Holy Ghost saying:

‘O Holy Ghost, soul of my soul, I adore Thee.

Enlighten, guide, strengthen and console me.

Tell me what I ought to do and command me to do it.

I promise to be submissive in everything that

Thou permittest to happen to me.

Only show me what is Thy will!’

“If you do this your life will pass happily and serenely. Consolation will abound even in the midst of troubles. Grace will be given in proportion to the trial as well as strength to bear it, bringing you to the Gates of Paradise full of merit.” Fr. Hagspiel adds: “We must get back to the spirit of God if we want to prove ourselves staunch Christians and true members of Holy Mother Church. We must again make this devotion to the Holy Ghost the outstanding devotion among all members of the Catholic Church after the example of the Christians of old in order to rid ourselves of the spirit of the world.”

Make no mistake — there is at this very moment a fierce battle being waged for our souls. It is a life and death battle — spiritual life and death — conceived and set in motion by the rulers of this world of perceptible darkness, the masters of evil and deception. It takes little imagination at this point to envision what those in power today eventually have in store for anyone refusing to obey their commands. In order to successfully fight this battle, all Christians must be fitted with the spiritual armor described by Saint Paul that they may be able to overcome “the spirits of wickedness in the high places” (Ephesians, Ch. 6:13). The first piece of that armor is having your loins girt about in truth (Ibid., v. 14). The breastplate of justice (v. 15) and the gospel of peace comes next in verse 16. This order continues with the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation of the sword of the spirit, which is the word of God (verse 17-18). Christians are then instructed to beg the Saints for their intercession by “praying in the spirit” (verse 19).

Having thus armed themselves, the battle lines must be drawn: first in the battle against self — one’s own spiritual life — and second, in a more general manner, to fight together as Catholics against the spirits of wickedness now cast down upon this earth. Truth is the one most elusive piece of this armor so necessary to this spiritual combat and to eternal salvation. Without it no preparedness of any kind can even begin. Many today boast of all the measures they have taken to ensure their physical survival but what have they done, in equal and most necessarily in greater measure, to study the truths of faith and come to a clear understanding of what war it really is they are engaged in?

For every battle fought, battle lines must be drawn and only in the correct estimation of these lines can victory be assured. Catholics today do not know where to draw these lines. Some believe themselves to be Catholic when this is not even the case. Pope Benedict XV wrote in his encyclical Ad Beatissimi Apostolorum in 1914: “Such is the nature of Catholicism that it does not admit of more or less, but must be held as a whole or as a whole rejected:This is the Catholic faith, which unless a man believe faithfully and firmly; he cannot be saved (Athanas. Creed). There is no need of adding any qualifying terms to the profession of Catholicism: it is quite enough for each one to proclaim Christian is my name and Catholic my surname, only let him endeavour to be in reality what he calls himself.” What IS true Catholicism — who can count themselves as members of this most noble society, the Mystical Body of Christ on earth? How successful the enemy has already been in penetrating the camp of the Saints and how few indeed are fully aware of the destruction he has wrought! Those exploring this topic have offered several explanations and remedies but all of them entirely miss the point, in whole or in part. The type of approach to employ in evaluating the dire situation in the Church today — for those who truly believe there is a major departure in teaching belief and practice over the past 60 plus years — is not to analyze persons and events and dialogue readers to death.

If we truly believe in the words of Holy Scripture; if we are truly willing to prepare ourselves to fight this spiritual battle, then we must be willing also to abandon any preconceived notion of this truth and return to its age-old sources.

Prior to his death, the Reformation martyr St. Thomas More told his Anglican interrogators:

       “For I doubt not, but of the learned and virtuous men now alive — I do not speak only of this Realm, but of all Christendom — there are ten to one of my mind in this matter; but if I should take notice of those learned Doctors and virtuous Fathers that are already dead, many of whom are Saints in Heaven, I am sure there are far more, who all the while they lived thought in this Cause as I do now. And therefore, my Lord, I do not think myself bound to conform my conscience to the counsel of one Kingdom, against the general consent of all Christendom” (From The Trial of Sir Thomas More, May 7, 1535 in A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceeding Upon Impeachments for High Treason, etc. (London, 1719), http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/more/moretrialreport.html).

How many Catholics or those calling themselves Catholics today really know what the Catholics in St. Thomas More’s time and before his death thought and believed? Do they really think that today they could say they believe the same as those Catholics believed, or even those who Fr. Hagspiel wrote for during the time of Pope Pius XII? Do they simply look at what exists today and believe what they are told is Catholic by those who never even saw the inside of a Catholic college or seminary, or do they study their faith and really know for a fact it is Catholic, from approved pre-1959 sources? Because between the death of Saint Thomas More and the death of Pope Pius XII, none of those beliefs changed; none of them. Nor did or could Christ’s very words in the liturgy change or any of the beliefs that Catholics have always held because truth never changes. It may become better defined, clearer, and made more available, but it forever remains the same because God is its ultimate author and is Himself incapable of change. Doctrine develops; it does not and cannot evolve. That is Modernism.

The solution for the lack of Catholicity in the world today begins by learning once again to “live in the spirit.” The following book by Robert B. Eiten, S.J.  provides some general guidelines for the lay person wishing to lead a more perfect life:

https://curate.nd.edu/show/8049g448904 

See also Cardinal Manning’s work on the Holy Ghost at:

https://ia800309.us.archive.org/14/items/TheHolyGhostTheSanctifier/TheHolyGhostTheSanctifier.pdf

May we all learn together to become once again the Catholic Christians Our Lord always intended us to be.

What in the World…

A good summary of the decline of the Church? Really?

I recently viewed an older video made by a Traditionalist “bishop” that reportedly gave a good summary of what happened to the Church that brought us to where we are today. The omissions found were not surprising but the fact that someone thought this a good summary of what had happened to the Church was disappointing to say the least. The history given was a truncated one, which in it itself is always prone to oversimplifying issues that should be explained more carefully. But the three major omissions, predictable though they were, is what was concerning. The reason they are concerning is that an entirely skewed and incomplete picture of what led to the infiltration of the Church results, one that does NOT give Catholics any meaningful idea of what really happened. This is not just an opinion but is based on incontrovertible facts. In rendering this history, the topics of Gallicanism, Freemasonry and the primary causes of Modernism are ignored. Look for a new article on this topic on the Articles page under The Churchfollowing the completion of the site rebuild.

A pope cannot become a heretic

A Traditionalist site has provided the partial translation of a work by the theologian and canonist Felix Cappello that categorically states the pope cannot become a heretic. This teaching of St. Robert Bellarmine has been presented on this site for decades. While what Cappello says is very instructive, given the claims by Novus Ordo and other so-called Traditionalist clergy and lay writers to the contrary, it does not address the problem of what happened following the death of Pope Pius XII. This site has never maintained that John 23 was not a pope because he became a heretic while in office, as others have claimed regarding the usurpers. It has been demonstrated repeatedly that John 23 was suspect of heresy PRIOR to his election, can be judged as a heretic based on his statements and behavior pre-election, and in the end was doubtfully elected on several different counts. So ergo, per St. Robert Bellarmine, Roncalli could never have been pope. All this is based on the teachings of Pope Paul IV’s 1559 infallible bull, Cum ex Apostolatus Officio.

Follow this up with Canon 2391 §1, which states “A college which knowingly elects an unworthy person is automatically deprived for that particular election of the right to hold a new election.” The conduct of the cardinals at the false Vatican 2 council alone proves they knowingly elected Roncalli for they willingly went along with everything he proposed. So bingo, we can kill two birds with one stone and be rid of both Roncalli and Montini thanks to Can. 2391. But now we have Novus Ordo conservatives alleging that Francis was invalidly elected (ya think?!) and Benedict 16, the known Modernist, is still pope. What is it with these folks that makes it so impossible for them to extend their thinking processes to Roncalli? Is it the thought of all the tithes wasted, the errors learned, the sacraments never received?  Well join the club, people, and start making amends. We cannot control our past but we can and must repent and take charge of our future. If we are really serious about saving our souls, we cannot waste time lamenting over the fact we were duped. For none of us ever know when our time is up.

Further notes on Fatima

Having said my last about Fatima, relatively speaking, I want to sum everything up with this. Marian apparitions all have the same message: Pray, do penance, make sacrifices for sinners, perform your daily duties and if the world does not convert, expect a terrible, twofold chastisement, one spiritual (which we have already seen) and the other physical, which we may soon expect. We don’t need any more particulars. Had Catholics studied doctrine and obeyed the popes, had they concentrated less on Fatima and Rosary crusades, anti-Commie rallies and other popular devotions and learned their faith, we would not be where we are today. The rally mentality and profit mongering created around Fatima was likely intended to distract the laity from the infiltration of the Church. “My people have been silent, because they had no knowledge: because thou hast rejected knowledge, I will reject thee, that thou shalt not do the office of priesthood to me” (speaking to the Jewish priests — Hosea 4:6). Prophecy fulfilled.

We are not required to believe in any given apparition; but we must accept every truth of faith that is taught by the Church and obey the Roman Pontiffs. We have to recognize that the Fatima messages most likely were falsified to an unknown degree and are now being used as a propaganda vehicle. (Francis recently embraced the Russian Orthodox Patriarch as part of the church in Rome, as anticipated.) Therefore we must reject the falsification of those messages and all that comes from it. Beyond that, nothing more is necessary. For those wishing to hear more on this topic, see our most recent video at:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6Gltn_ZdfGo

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Happy Mother’s day, Blessed Mother, and all you Catholic moms out there

Happy Mother’s day, Blessed Mother, and all you Catholic moms out there

+Third Sunday after Easter+

The following was sent to me by my daughter, Aimee, mother of five and a fervent pro-life activist. Like me she loved being pregnant and always felt there was a special, mysterious symbiosis between mother and child that she could never quite explain. Finally, she found research that provided the perfect explanation for it, as expressed below.

“When pregnant, the cells of the baby migrate into the mothers bloodstream and then circle back into the baby, it’s called ‘fetal-maternal microchimerism.’⁠

“For 41 weeks, the cells circulate and merge backwards and forwards, and after the baby is born, many of these cells stay in the mother’s body, leaving a permanent imprint in the mothers tissues, bones, brain, and skin, and often stay there for decades.

“Every single child a mother has afterwards will leave a similar imprint on her body, too. Even if a pregnancy doesn’t go to full term or if you have an abortion, these cells still migrate into your bloodstream.

“Research has shown that if a mother’s heart is injured, fetal cells will rush to the site of the injury and change into different types of cells that specialize in mending the heart. The baby helps repair the mother, while the mother builds the baby.

“How cool is that? This is often why certain illnesses vanish while pregnant.

“It’s incredible how mothers bodies protect the baby at all costs, and the baby protects and rebuilds the mother back – so that the baby can develop safely and survive.

“Think about crazy cravings for a moment. What was the mother deficient in that the baby made them crave?

“Studies have also shown cells from a fetus in a mother’s brain 18 years after she gave birth. How amazing is that?”

If you’re a mom you know how you can intuitively feel your child even when they are not there… Well, now there is scientific proof that moms carry them for years and years even after they have given birth to them.”

I find this to be so very beautiful.

Prayer Intention and checklist

My apologies for not posting this sooner! Website revision has kept me very busy. Here is the intention for this month, in Honor of Our Lady’s Queenship May 31:

“Queen and Mother of Christendom hear our prayers, and by thy peace make happy a world shaken by hate.” (Pope Pius XII, Ad caeli reginam, 1954)

Month of May

8 Sunday 3rd Sunday after Easter

Apparition of St. Michael the Archangel

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

9 Monday

St. Gregory Nazianzen

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

10 Tuesday

St. Antoninus; Sts. Gordian & Epimachus

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

11 Wednesday

Octave Day of St. Joseph

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

12 Thursday

St. Nereus & Comp.

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

 

13 Friday

St. Robert Bellarmine

🔲 Abstinence

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

🔲 Spiritual Mass and Mortification for the intentions of the Society

🔲 Renew consecrations to SH and SIH to promote their interests and intentions

14 Saturday dedicated to Our Lady

St. Boniface

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Berthe Petit’s Consecration

🔲 Devotion to the SIH with the intention to renew oneself in the spirit of the Society

🔲 Holy Rosary

15 Sunday 4th Sunday after Easter

St. John Baptist de la Salle

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

16 Monday

St. Ubaldus

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

17 Tuesday

St. Paschal Baylon

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

18 Wednesday

St. Venantius

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

19 Thursday

St. Peter Celestine, St. Pudentiana

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

20 Friday

St. Bernardine of Siena

🔲 Abstinence

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

🔲 Spiritual Mass and Mortification for the intentions of the Society

🔲 Renew consecrations to SH and SIH to promote their interests and intentions

 

21 Saturday dedicated to Our Lady

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Berthe Petit’s Consecration

🔲 Devotion to the SIH with the intention to renew oneself in the spirit of the Society

🔲 Holy Rosary

22 Sunday 5th Sunday after Easter

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

23 Monday Ferial Day

Rogation Day

Lesser Litanies

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

24 Tuesday Ferial Day

Rogation Day

Lesser Litanies

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

25 Wednesday

St. Gregory VII, St. Urban I

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

26 Thursday ASCENSION THURSDAY

HOLY DAY

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

27 Friday

St. Bede, the Venerable, St. John I

🔲 Abstinence

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

🔲 Spiritual Mass and Mortification for the intentions of the Society

🔲 Renew consecrations to SH and SIH to promote their interests and intentions

28 Saturday dedicated to Our Lady

St. Augustine of Canterbury

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Berthe Petit’s Consecration

🔲 Devotion to the SIH with the intention to renew oneself in the spirit of the Society

🔲 Holy Rosary

29 Sunday within Octave of Ascension

St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

30 Monday

Within the Octave

St. Felix I

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

31 Tuesday

QUEENSHIP OF THE BVM

Within the Octave

St. Petronilla

🔲 Morning Offering in reparation for sins

🔲 Consecration by Pope Pius XII

🔲 Devotion to the SIH

🔲 Holy Rosary

Prayers to be Practiced in Common

▪︎Spiritual Mass in union with all of the Sacrifices of the Mass ever offered throughout the world, preceded by the Perfect Act of Contrition and followed by Spiritual Communion.

▪︎Devotion to the Agonizing Heart of Jesus, in favor of the many thousands of persons who die every day.

▪︎Devotion to the souls in Purgatory.

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